Like us on Facebook!
 

LOGIN

REGISTER

English English
previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

A Blurb From Bruce

A Blurb from Bruce – Protocol vs. Blog Post – Which do you choose?

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Guideline-vs.-Blog-Post.jpg

There has been a recent upsurge in the numbers and personality types of private and commercial social media platforms.  These include, but are not limited to blogs, twitter handles, podcasts and facebook pages.  Simultaneously exciting and scary, these (at times) bold and controversial domains can be the breeding ground for the good and the bad.  With the rapidly changing front of medicine, and its diversified application to basic and advanced medical services as well as critical care support teams, clinicians today must possess and use a high degree of discernment when providing patient care.

 

This came to light for me during a recent conversation I had with my good friend Eric Bauer, the CEO of FlightBridgeED.  As the key architect to his successful work, Eric relayed an important and concerning concept that he has watched trend to popular status.  This is the realization that more and more clinicians and providers, are turning their medical ear to his insight and recommendations.  During the course of our conversation it became clear to both Eric and I that we must (along with the many other reputable sources of clinically trendy info) make it clear to the subscribers and supporters that they STILL NEED TO FOLLOW their local protocols or guidelines, especially during the provision of patient care.

This is not unique to one establishment or the other, but a kind and gentle reminder that the pursuit of current data trends, the use of evidence-based practice and absorption of all things medically amazing, is praise-worthy and good.  However, changing the way you deliver care is still guided by your local policies, protocols, regulations and leadership.  It is perfectly OK to arm yourself with the myriad of available knowledge and present recommendations or proposed changes to your local administration, but it CAN NOT replace the current guidelines that you practice under in your local jurisdiction.

A recommendation that I might suggest is using the things that you see, hear or read to present a legitimate, data driven change project to your local leadership.  Take the knowledge you learn and use it to drive change within your specific area.  Not all ideas, thoughts, words, etc. are going to be right for you or your team, but often the curiosity that is ignited can be the catalyst to the “new and improved” in your neck of the woods…

Be well and stay safe out there!!

Bruce

 

Bruce Hoffman is a critical care nurse, paramedic and current graduate student.  He works as both a clinician and educator in Connecticut, Massachusetts and Maryland, with background in the division of critical care (ICU, ER, Cardiology, and Flight).  He enjoys professional gigs in clinical and distance medical education, advocacy, leadership, consultation and blogging.  He is a frequent and national lecturer for a host of Emergency Medical Services and Critical Care continuing education programs. He remains a member of his hometown ambulance service where he has served in a variety of administrative and operational roles. In his spare time, Bruce enjoys spending time with his wife Stephanie as well as traveling, hiking and biking.

 

 

 © 2018 FlightBridgeED, Inc. - All rights reserved.

~ Established 2012. FlightBridgeED, Inc. is a Corporation headquartered in Scottsville, Kentucky.~
The name FlightBridgeED is a registered trademark of FlightBridgeED, LLC. The FlightBridgeED helicopter logo is a trademark of FlightBridgeED, LLC.
F.A.S.T. is a sales mark of FlightBridgeED, LLC. related to printed books and other related meterials, as well as the F.A.S.T. symposium.

Privacy Policy - Refund Policy - Exam Pass Commitment